Fruit slaw adds punch of color to winter menus

By | | Cooking, Eating In

Shredded Brussels sprouts with thin half-moons of crunchy bright orange fuyu persimmons plus the deep red confetti of pomegranate seeds make up Brussels Sprouts Winter Fruit Slaw.
I was standing in a grocery store this past week looking at the stalks of Brussels sprouts, remembering the first time I saw them and thought, “Oh, so that’s how they grow.” How much more efficient than the tiny cabbages growing in rows I’d imagined.

Roasted Brussels sprouts are the best, their edges browned, their flavor sweetened by roasting. They do, however, lack something, being olive drab and a bit on the homely side.

The stalk of sprouts and a nearby display of fruit made me consider something prettier. I wanted a dish that would be delicious and colorful to add to a holiday menu.

A slaw of shredded Brussels sprouts with thin half-moons of crunchy bright orange fuyu persimmons plus the deep red confetti of pomegranate seeds sounded right. All it needed was a light dressing and a splash of fresh lemon juice.

Make sure you get the right variety of persimmon. In general, you’ll find fuyus and hachiyas. For this recipe, use the fuyus that look like a squatty tomato and can be eaten at any stage of ripeness.

Hachiyas are more oblong with a pointy bottom. They must be dead ripe, the flesh like jelly, before eating. If they aren’t completely ripe, a taste of this fruit is astringent and leaves an unpleasant sensation in your mouth. It could put you off all pomegrates for a while.

The dressing is made with white balsamic vinegar because it’s a milder vinegar and won’t change the color of the salad. A squeeze of fresh lemon juice adds a bright citrus note.

I didn’t use all lemon juice for the dressing because seemed too sour. If you want to go that way for more lemon flavor, you might want to add a pinch or two of sugar or honey to offset the sourness.

This salad keeps well for several days. It will soften a bit and the pale green of the Brussels sprouts will deepen, but the flavor stays intact.

This salad is good with any meal that could use color and crunch. Serve it with grilled salmon, roast chicken or a pulled pork sandwich.

Brussels Sprouts Winter Fruit Slaw is good with any meal that could use color and crunch.

Brussels Sprouts Winter Fruit Slaw

Serves 8

  • 8 cups halved and shredded Brussels sprouts
  • 1 1/2 cups halved and sliced into crescents fuyu persimmons (2 to 3, depending on size)
  • 1 cup pomegranate seeds
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon (about 1 Tablespoon)
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Put the Brussels sprouts into a bowl. Tease the shreds apart a little with your hands. Add the fruit and toss to mix. Drizzle on the olive oil, vinegar and lemon juice. Toss to dress evenly. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Cover and keep chilled until serving, but it’s also good served at room temperature.

Variations

  • Add shaved Parmesan cheese.
  • Add a tablespoon or so of finely diced red onion.

Fruit slaw adds punch of color to winter menus

Shredded Brussels sprouts with thin half-moons of crunchy bright orange fuyu persimmons plus the deep red confetti of pomegranate seeds make up Brussels Sprouts Winter Fruit Slaw.
I was standing in a grocery store this past week looking at the stalks of Brussels sprouts, remembering the first time I saw them and thought, “Oh, so that’s how they grow.” How much more efficient than the tiny cabbages growing in rows I’d imagined.

Roasted Brussels sprouts are the best, their edges browned, their flavor sweetened by roasting. They do, however, lack something, being olive drab and a bit on the homely side.

The stalk of sprouts and a nearby display of fruit made me consider something prettier. I wanted a dish that would be delicious and colorful to add to a holiday menu.

A slaw of shredded Brussels sprouts with thin half-moons of crunchy bright orange fuyu persimmons plus the deep red confetti of pomegranate seeds sounded right. All it needed was a light dressing and a splash of fresh lemon juice.

Make sure you get the right variety of persimmon. In general, you’ll find fuyus and hachiyas. For this recipe, use the fuyus that look like a squatty tomato and can be eaten at any stage of ripeness.

Hachiyas are more oblong with a pointy bottom. They must be dead ripe, the flesh like jelly, before eating. If they aren’t completely ripe, a taste of this fruit is astringent and leaves an unpleasant sensation in your mouth. It could put you off all pomegrates for a while.

The dressing is made with white balsamic vinegar because it’s a milder vinegar and won’t change the color of the salad. A squeeze of fresh lemon juice adds a bright citrus note.

I didn’t use all lemon juice for the dressing because seemed too sour. If you want to go that way for more lemon flavor, you might want to add a pinch or two of sugar or honey to offset the sourness.

This salad keeps well for several days. It will soften a bit and the pale green of the Brussels sprouts will deepen, but the flavor stays intact.

This salad is good with any meal that could use color and crunch. Serve it with grilled salmon, roast chicken or a pulled pork sandwich.

Brussels Sprouts Winter Fruit Slaw is good with any meal that could use color and crunch.

Brussels Sprouts Winter Fruit Slaw

Serves 8

  • 8 cups halved and shredded Brussels sprouts
  • 1 1/2 cups halved and sliced into crescents fuyu persimmons (2 to 3, depending on size)
  • 1 cup pomegranate seeds
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon (about 1 Tablespoon)
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Put the Brussels sprouts into a bowl. Tease the shreds apart a little with your hands. Add the fruit and toss to mix. Drizzle on the olive oil, vinegar and lemon juice. Toss to dress evenly. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Cover and keep chilled until serving, but it’s also good served at room temperature.

Variations

  • Add shaved Parmesan cheese.
  • Add a tablespoon or so of finely diced red onion.

By Kim Davaz

Kim Davaz always wants to know the story behind a recipe. She’s written about food for The Register-Guard since 1995. Follow her on Twitter @kimdavaz; contact her here.